Past Events: 2011


Feb. 8, 2011


2Tuesday Global Spotlight Series:
The Centennial Stage: Mexico’s Independence Celebrations in 1910 & 2010

By Patrick J. McNamara, Professor, Department of History

This presentation deals with the interaction between memory formation and performance in Mexico during two periods of commemorative events. Mexico’s 1910 Centennial celebrations of independence from Spain created a popular stage for citizens to re-enact their own history. This process of reflecting on the past created a new series of conflicts and tensions that contributed to the outbreak of revolutionary violence in 1910. One hundred years later, Mexico celebrated its bicentennial of independence from Spain amidst a political context marked once again by violence and social division. The presentation will highlight key differences and similarities between 1910 and 2010.

The 2Tuesday Series is a monthly event to highlight University of Minnesota activities related to the 2010-12 Global Spotlight focus on Latin America and the Caribbean and the issue of the Impact of Urbanization.


Mar. 8, 2011


2Tuesday Global Spotlight Series:
The Galapagos – Fragile Past, Brighter Future

By Julia Ponder, Assistant Clinical Professor, and Executive Director, The Raptor Center

Partnering with collaborators from around the world, the Galapagos National Park is working to prevent extinctions and restore ecosystems altered over time. The focus is to permanently remove invasive rodents, with a critical component of preventing non-target species mortality. The University of Minnesota's Raptor Center led the effort to protect the endemic Galapagos hawk from secondary poisoning during the Rabida Island project.

The 2Tuesday Series is a monthly event to highlight University of Minnesota activities related to the 2010-12 Global Spotlight focus on Latin America and the Caribbean and the issue of the Impact of Urbanization.


Apr. 12, 2011


2Tuesday Global Spotlight Series:
Gracious Acts of Geometry; Steretomic and Underlying Geometry Analysis of Three 16-Century Vaults in Oaxaca, Mexico

By Benjamin Ibarra-Sevilla, Assistant Professor, School of Architecture

During medieval times and the renaissance simple line drawings gave birth to sophisticated solutions of masonry vaulting construction. These drawings contained straightforward information useful to the construction of sophisticated self-supporting masonry structures. This presentation focuses on the design origins of three Mexican vaults built in the sixteenth century examining their underlying geometry and their construction solutions. It exposes the connection between European vaulting design and these Mexican vaults illustrating the evolution of masonry building systems. The presentation makes emphasis on the use of stereotomy as analysis tool for historic masonry structures.

The 2Tuesday Series is a monthly event to highlight University of Minnesota activities related to the 2010-12 Global Spotlight focus on Latin America and the Caribbean and the issue of the Impact of Urbanization.


May 10, 2011


2Tuesday Global Spotlight Series:
Responding Globally to Violence Against Women and Children

By Jeffrey L. Edleson, Director, Minnesota Center Against Violence & Abuse
Professor and Director of Research, School of Social Work

Professor Jeffrey Edleson will speak on his international research on violence
against women and children, on recent global surveys of organizations working to
engage men in violence prevention and his recent participation in the Institute of
Medicine's (National Academy of Sciences) Global Forum on Violence Prevention.
Professor Edleson has been a faculty member in the School of Social Work for
28 years, and is the Director of Research and is the Founder and Director of the
Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse.

The 2Tuesday Series is a monthly event to highlight University of Minnesota activities related to the 2010-12 Global Spotlight focus on Latin America and the Caribbean and the issue of the Impact of Urbanization.


Sep. 13, 2011


2Tuesday Global Spotlight Series:
Are We Entering an Age of Urban Revolution? Rethinking the “Miracles” of Shanghai and Bangalore in Light of the “Uprisings” in Cairo and London

By Associate Professor Michael Goldman, Department of Sociology
Global Studies and the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change (ICGC)

As a member of a university-wide collaboration, the Global Urban Laboratory, Professor Goldman introduces in this talk the idea that we have entered the age of urban revolutions. Three types will be presented. First, since the early 1990s, there has been a sea change in policies toward the urban, with leaders using cities as platforms for national integration into the global economy. By putting up for sale public goods and urban spaces, they are transforming the structure of labor and production, politics and rights, and access to space and goods in our cities.

Consequently and secondly, popular protests globally are sparking what appear to be political revolutions with deep urban roots and ambitions (e.g., Jakarta, Cairo, Tunis, Santiago, Madrid). Third, urban scholars and activists have begun to confront the staleness of our intellectual frameworks, inspiring a conceptual revolution grounded less in old models emanating from our traditional notions of global cities (London and New York) and more from new ways of seeing complex realities unfolding in cities in the global South. The talk will highlight dimensions to these three “urban revolutions,” with a focus on Goldman’s own research on Indian cities.

The 2Tuesday Series is a monthly event to highlight University of Minnesota activities related to the 2010-12 Global Spotlight focus on Latin America and the Caribbean and the issue of the Impact of Urbanization.


Oct. 11, 2011


2Tuesday Global Spotlight Series:
Nicaragua 2011: Needs and Assets — A Rural Perspective

  • Watch the presentation at https://umconnect.umn.edu/p82171836/

By Professor Therese Zink, MD, MPH, Family Medicine and Community Health

The Interfaith Service to Latin America (ISLA) has been working with the community of Jalapa, Nicaragua for more than 15 years. Due to the fighting of the contra war in the 1980s and Hurricane Mitch in the mid 1990s, Nicaragua has become the second poorest nation in the western hemisphere. Without much support of the Nicaraguan government, the people and their land have desperately needed the aid of foreign assistance. Over the past five years, ISLA have conducted household surveys to better understand the needs of the Japala community. Dr. Therese Zink, a professor in Family Medicine and the director of the Global Family Medicine Pathway, volunteers with ISLA and will discuss the current challenges and strengths of this rural area under the Ortega administration.

The 2Tuesday Series is a monthly event to highlight University of Minnesota activities related to the 2010-12 Global Spotlight focus on Latin America and the Caribbean and the issue of the Impact of Urbanization.


Nov. 8, 2011


2Tuesday Global Spotlight Series:
Cultural Differences in Conceptualizations of Power: Psychological, Political and Marketing Consequences

  • Watch the presentation at https://umconnect.umn.edu/p23408614/

By Assistant Professor Carlos Torelli, Carlson School of Management

Cultures nurture different views of what is desirable and meaningful to do with power.
In some collectivistic cultures (such as those in most of Latin America), power is for
benefiting and helping others, whereas in some individualistic cultures (such as those
in most of North America), power is for advancing one's personal status and prestige.
Professor Torelli will discuss the psychological, political and marketing consequences of these culturally nurtured conceptualizations of power.

The 2Tuesday Series is a monthly event to highlight University of Minnesota activities related to the 2010-12 Global Spotlight focus on Latin America and the Caribbean and the issue of the Impact of Urbanization.


Dec. 13, 2011


2Tuesday Global Spotlight Series:
Assessment, Accountability, and Opportunity to Learn in Guatemala

  • Watch the presentation at https://umconnect.umn.edu/p89005562/

by Associate Professor Michael Rodriguez, Educational Psychology

Professor Michael Rodriguez’s work with USAID in Guatemala established national academic content and achievement standards for the K-12 education system, a national assessment system to monitor performance in reading and mathematics, and a research agenda to understand variation in achievement across the country.

His current project with USAID focuses on professional development and policy design to strengthen the capacity of schools and teachers of Guatemala to implement the national standards and to meet the learning needs of diverse children. The presentation will focus on the challenges in meeting these goals with attention on issues of assessment and accountability in the face of significantly limited opportunity to learn.

The 2Tuesday Series is a monthly event to highlight University of Minnesota activities related to the 2010-12 Global Spotlight focus on Latin America and the Caribbean and the issue of the Impact of Urbanization.

Past Events